October 20

“The most tremendous thing which has been granted to man is: the choice, freedom. And if you desire to save it and preserve it there is only one way: in the very same second unconditionally and in complete resignation to give it back to God, and yourself with it. If the sight of what is granted to you tempts you, and if you give way to the temptation and look with egoistic desire upon the freedom of choice, then you lose your freedom.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Journals (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

Advertisements

October 19

“To become sober is: to come to oneself in self-knowledge and before God as nothing before him, yet infinitely, unconditionally engaged.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Judge for Yourself!: “Becoming Sober” (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 18

“If one were to say, ‘Either love or die,’ and thereby mean that a life without love was not worth living, then we should admit that he was absolutely right. But if by this he meant possessing the beloved, and consequently meant, either possess the beloved or die, either gain this friend or die, then we must say that such a love is dependent in a false sense. When love does not make the same demands upon itself that it makes on the object of its love, while it is still dependent on that love, then it is dependent in a false sense: the law of its existence lies outside itself, and hence it is dependent in the corruptible, earthly, temporal sense.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Works Of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 17

“To be alone with Holy Scripture! I dare not! If I open it — any passage — it traps me at once; it asks me (indeed, it is as if it were God himself who asked me): Have you done what you read there? And then, then — yes, then I am trapped. Then either straightway into action — or immediately a humbling admission.”
——————————————————–

~Source: For Self-Examination: Recommended To The Present Age (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 16

“The Genesis story presents the only dialectically consistent view. Its whole content is really concentrated in one statement: Sin came into the world by a sin. Were this not so, sin would have come into the world as something accidental…. Thus sin comes into the world as the sudden, i.e., by a leap; but this leap also posits the quality and is presupposed by the quality and the quality by the leap…. To express this precisely and accurately, one must say that by the first sin, sinfulness came into Adam.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Concept of Anxiety (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Vigilius Haufniensis

October 15

“Anxiety may be compared with dizziness. He whose eye happens to look down into the yawning abyss becomes dizzy But what is the reason for this? It is just as much in his own eye as in the abyss, for suppose he had not looked down. Hence anxiety is the dizziness of freedom, which emerges when the spirit wants to posit the synthesis and freedom looks down into its own possiblity, laying hold of finiteness to support itself. Freedom succumbs in this dizziness. Further than this, psychology cannot and will not go. In that very moment everything is changed, and freedom, when it again rises, sees that it is guilty. Between these two moments lies the leap, which no science has explained and which no science can explain.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Concept of Anxiety (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Vigilius Haufniensis

October 14

“For it is always the imperishable which sustains the perishable, the spiritual which sustains the corporal; and if it might be conceived that an exanimate body could for a little while continue to perform its customary functions, it would in the same way be comic and tragic. But only let our age go on consuming — and the more it manages to consume of the substantial value contained in romantic love, with all the more consternation will it some day, when this annihilation no longer gives pleasure, awaken to the consciousness of what it has lost and despairingly feel its misfortune.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Either/Or: A Fragment Of Life (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Victor Eremita

October 13

“The Christianity of the priests, by the aid of religion (which, alas, is used precisely to bring about the opposite), is directed to cementing families more and more egoistically together, and to arranging family festivities, beautiful, splendid family festivities, e.g. infant baptism and confirmation, which festivities, compared for example with excursions in the Deer Park and other family frolics, have a peculiar enchantment for the fact that they are “also” religious. ‘Woe unto you,’ says Christ to the “lawyers” (the interpreters of the Scripture), “for ye took away the key of knowledge, ye entered not in yourselves, and them that were entering in ye hindered.'”
——————————————————–

~Source: Attack on “Christendom” (1854-55)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 12

“Abraham I cannot understand, in a certain sense there is nothing I can learn from him but astonishment. If people fancy that by considering the outcome of this [story of Abraham and Isaac] they might be moved to believe, they deceive themselves and want to swindle God out of the first movement of faith, the infinite resignation. They would suck worldly wisdom out of the paradox. Perhaps one or another may succeed in that, for our age is not willing to stop with faith, with its miracle of turning water into wine; it goes further, it turns wine into water.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Fear and Trembling (1843 )
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 11

“Persistent striving is the ethical life view of the existing subject.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

« Older entries Newer entries »