June 30

“The individual no longer belongs to God, to himself, to his beloved, to his art or to his science; he is conscious of belonging in all things to an abstraction to which he is subjected by reflection, just a serf belongs to an estate. That is why people band together in cases where it is an absolute contradiction to be more than one. The apotheosis of the positive principle of association is nowadays the devouring and demoralizing principle which in the slavery of reflection makes even virtues into vitia splendida. There is no other reason for this than that eternal responsibility and the religious singling out of the individual before God is ignored. When corruption sets in at that point, people seek consolation in company, and so reflection catches the individual for life. And those who do not realize even the beginning of this crisis are engulfed without further ado in the reflective relationship.”
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~Source: The Present Age: A Literary Review (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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June 29

“Once in a while a parson causes a little hubbub from the pulpit, about their being something wrong somewhere with all these numerous Christians — but all those *to* whom he is speaking are Christians, and those he speaks *about* are not present.”
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~Source: The Point Of View For My Work As An Author (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 14

“The immediate love can be changed in itself, it can be changed into its opposite, into hate. Hate is a love which has become its opposite, a love which has perished… As it is said about the tongue, that ‘out of the same mouth proceedeth both blessing and cursing,’ so we must also say that it is the same love which loves and hates; but just because it is the same love, precisely therefore it is not in the eternal sense the true love which remains the same and unchanged, while that immediate love, if it is changed, at bottom is still the same. The true love, which underwent the change of the eternal by becoming duty, is never changed; it is simple, it loves–and never hates, never hates–the beloved” ——————————————————– ~Source: Works of Love (1847) Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 11

“Much is heard in the world about unhappy love, and we all know what this means: the lovers are prevented from realizing their union, the causes being many and various. There exists another kind of unhappy love, the theme of our present discourse, for which there is no perfect earthly parallel, though by dint of speaking foolishly a little while we may make shift to conceive it through an earthly figure. The unhappiness of this love does not come from the inability of the lovers to realize their union, but from their inability to understand one another.”
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~Source: Philosophical Fragments (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

June 10

“It has often been said that a reformation should begin with each man reforming himself. That, however, is not what actually happened, for the Reformation produced a hero who paid God high enough for his position as hero. By joining up with him directly people buy cheap, indeed at bargain prices, what he had paid for so dearly; but they do not buy the highest of all things. The abstract principle of leveling, on the contrary, like the biting east wind, has no personal relation to any individual, but has only an abstract relationship which is the same for everyone.”
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~Source: The Present Age: A Literary Review (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 09

“It was about ten o’clock in the evening of one of the last days of July when the participators assembled for that banquet. I have forgotten the day of the month and even the year; such things are the concern of memory, not of recollection. The only thing that properly concerns recollection is mood and what pertains to mood; and just as a generous wine gains by passing over the line because the watery particles evaporate, so too does recollection gain by losing the watery particles of memory — yet by this the recollection no more becomes a mere fancy than does the generous wine.”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

June 08

“But this precisely is now the misfortune of Christendom, as for many, many years it has been, that Christ is neither the one thing nor the other, neither what He was when He lived on earth, nor what (as is believed) He shall be at His return, but one about whom in an illicit way, through history, people have learned to know something to the effect that He was somebody or another of considerable consequence. In an unpermissible and unlawful way people have become *knowing* about Christ, for the only permissible way is to be *believing*.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

June 07

“From the very beginning, I have stressed and repeated unchanged that I was ‘without authority.’ I regard myself rather as a reader of the books, not as the author. ‘Before God,’ religiously, I call my whole work as an author (when I speak with myself) my own upbringing and development, but not in the sense as if I were now complete or completely finished with respect to needing upbringing and development.” ——————————————————– ~Source: On My Work as an Author (1851) Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 04

“What an individual is capable of may be measured by how far his understanding is from his willing. What a person can understand he must also be able to make himself will. Between understanding and willing lie the excuses and evasions.”
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~Source: The Journals (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 03

“Would it not be better to stop with faith, and is it not revolting that everybody wants to go further?… Would it not be better that they should stand still at faith, and that he who stands should take heed lest he fall? For movements of faith must constantly be made by virtue of the absurd, yet in such a way, be it observed, that one does not lose the finite but gains it every inch. For my part I can well describe the movements of faith, but I cannot make them.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes de Silentio

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