June 30

“The individual no longer belongs to God, to himself, to his beloved, to his art or to his science; he is conscious of belonging in all things to an abstraction to which he is subjected by reflection, just a serf belongs to an estate. That is why people band together in cases where it is an absolute contradiction to be more than one. The apotheosis of the positive principle of association is nowadays the devouring and demoralizing principle which in the slavery of reflection makes even virtues into vitia splendida. There is no other reason for this than that eternal responsibility and the religious singling out of the individual before God is ignored. When corruption sets in at that point, people seek consolation in company, and so reflection catches the individual for life. And those who do not realize even the beginning of this crisis are engulfed without further ado in the reflective relationship.”
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~Source: The Present Age: A Literary Review (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 29

“Once in a while a parson causes a little hubbub from the pulpit, about their being something wrong somewhere with all these numerous Christians — but all those *to* whom he is speaking are Christians, and those he speaks *about* are not present.”
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~Source: The Point Of View For My Work As An Author (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 28

“So then, the fact that the man in despair is unaware that his condition is despair has nothing to do with the case–he is in despair all the same. If despair is bewilderment, then the fact that one is unconscious of it is the additional aggravation of being at the same time under a delusion. Unconsciousness of despair is like unconsciousness of dread: the dread characteristic of spiritlessness is recognizable precisely by the spiritless sense of security; but nevertheless dread is at the bottom of it, and when the enchantment of illusion is broken, when existence begins to totter, then too does despair manifest itself as that which was at the bottom.”
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~Source: The Sickness Unto Death (1849)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 27

“Persistent striving is the ethical life view of the existing subject.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 26

“What the conception of God or an eternal happiness is to effect in the individual is, that he transform his entire existence in relation thereto, and this transformation is a process of dying away from the immediate. This is slowly brought about, but finally he will feel himself confined within the absolute conception of God; for the absolute conception of God does not consist in having such a conception en passant, but consists in having the absolute conception at every moment.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

June 25

“If I imagine myself meeting Socrates or Prodicus or the servant-girl in another life, then again neither of them could be more to me than an occasion, which Socrates fearlessly expressed by saying that even in the lower world he proposed merely to ask questions; for the underlying principle of all questioning is that the one who is asked must have the Truth within himself, and be able to acquire it by himself.”
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~Source: Philosophical Fragments (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacusjo

June 24

“The fact that despair does not consume him is so far from being any comfort to the despairing man that it is precisely the opposite, this comfort is precisely the torment, it is precisely this that keeps the gnawing pain alive and keeps life in the pain. This precisely is the reason why he despairs — not to say despaired — because he cannot consume himself, cannot get rid of himself, cannot become nothing. This is the potentiated formula for despair, the rising of the fever in the sickness of the self.”
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~Source: The Sickness Unto Death (1849)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

June 23

“But when it is a duty to love, there no test is needed and the insulting stupidity of wishing to test is superfluous; since love is higher than any proof, it has already more than met the test, in the same sense that faith ‘more than conquers.’ The very fact of testing always presupposes a possibility; it is still always possible that that which is tested may not meet the test. Hence if someone wished to test whether he has faith, or tried to get faith, then this would really mean that he will hinder himself in aquiring faith; he will become a victim of the restless craving where faith is never won, for ‘thou shalt believe.'”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 22

“The difference between the tragic hero and Abraham is clearly evident. The tragic hero still remains within the ethical. He lets one expression of the ethical find its telos in a higher expression of the ethical; the ethical relation between father and son, or daughter and father, he reduces to a sentiment which has its dialectic in the idea of morality. Here there can be no question of the teleological suspension of the ethical.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

June 21

“Ethically the ideality is the real within the individual himself. The real is an inwardness that is infinitely interested in existing; this is exemplified in the ethical individual.”

~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

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