January 31

“Why did Kant begin with quantity, Hegel with quality?”
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~Source: The Journals (1842)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 30

“If it is certain that death exists, which it is; if it is certain that with death’s decision all is over; if it is certain that death itself never becomes involved in giving any explanation — well, then it is a matter of understanding oneself, and the earnest understanding is that if death is night then life is day, that if no work can be done at night then work can be done during the day; and the terse but impelling cry of earnestness, like death’s terse cry, is: This very day.”
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~Source: Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions: “At a Graveside” (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 29

“There is only one proof of the truth of Christianity and that, quite rightly, is from the emotions, when the dread of sin and a heavy conscience torture a man into crossing the narrow line between despair bordering upon madness — and Christendom.

There lies Christianity.”
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~Source: The Journals (1849)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 28

“Life is a masquerade, you explain, and for you this is inexhaustible material for amusement; and so far, no one has succeeded in knowing you; for every revelation you make is always an illusion, it is only in this way that you are able to breathe and prevent people from pressing importunately upon you and obstructing your respiration. Your occupation consists in preserving your hidingplace, and that you succeed in doing, for your mask is the most enigmatic of all. In fact you are nothing; you are merely a relation to others, and what you are you are by virtue of this relation.”
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~Source: Either/Or: A Fragment Of Life (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Victor Eremita

January 27

“People reproach others for fearing God too much. Quite rightly, for in order really to love God it is necessary to have feared God; the bourgeois’ love of God begins when vegetable life is most active, when the hands are comfortably folded on the stomach, and the head sinks back into the cushions of the chair, while the eyes, drunk with sleep, gaze heavily for a moment toward the ceiling.”
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~Source: The Journals (1837)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 26

“The greater honesty in even the bitterest attacks on Christianity in the past lay in the fact that they left it reasonably clear what Christianity is. The danger with Hegel was that he changed Christianity — and by doing so got it to conform with his philosophy. It is characteristic of an age of reason in general not to let the task remain intact and say, No, but to change it and say, Yes, why bless me, we are in agreement. The hypocrisy of reason is infinitely insidious. That is why it is so difficult to catch sight of.”
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~Source: The Journals (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 25, 2011

“If it is certain that death exists, which it is; if it is certain that with death’s decision all is over; if it is certain that death itself never becomes involved in giving any explanation — well, then it is a matter of understanding oneself, and the earnest understanding is that if death is night then life is day, that if no work can be done at night then work can be done during the day; and the terse but impelling cry of earnestness, like death’s terse cry, is: This very day.”
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~Source: Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions: “At a Graveside” (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 24

“Knowledge about God being love is not yet the consciousness of it. For to have consciousness, a personal consciousness, it is requisite that in my knowing I have at the same time knowledge of myself and of my relationship to my knowing. This is to believe that God is love, it is to love Him.”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “All Things Must Serve for Good — When We Love God” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 23

“In making a great decision, in the publication of a work which will presumably transform the world, in time of earthquakes, at golden-wedding festivities, in perils of the sea, and in the connection with a clandestine birth, the name of God is perhaps used quite as often by way of ejaculation as religiously.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

January 22

“Oh, the sins of passion and of the heart — how much nearer to salvation than the sins of reason!”
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~Source: The Journals (18??)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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