November 30

“That Christianity is antithetical to pantheism can also be seen from the caricature that accompanies it. Clearly, the caricature of pantheism is the evaporation of the person through sensuality, the poetic world projected by the individual in which true conscious existence is surrendered and everything is poetry, in which at most the individual is like the flower in woven damask. The antithesis of Christianity is hypocrisy, but this is clearly based on the reality of moral concepts: personality, accountability.”
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~Source: The Journals (1839)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 29

“Knowledge about God being love is not yet the consciousness of it. For to have consciousness, a personal consciousness, it is requisite that in my knowing I have at the same time knowledge of myself and of my relationship to my knowing. This is to believe that God is love, it is to love Him.”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “All Things Must Serve for Good — When We Love God” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 28

“Fools and young men prate about everything being possible for a man. That, however, is a great error. Spiritually speaking, everything is possible, but in the world of the finite there is much which is not possible. This impossible, however, the knight makes possible by expressing it spiritually, but he expresses it spiritually by waiving his claim to it. The wish which would carry him into reality, but was wrecked upon the impossibility, is now bent inward, but it is not therefore lost, neither is it forgotten.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

November 27

“The minds of men so often yearn for might and power, and their thoughts are constantly being drawn to such things, as if by their attainment all mysteries would be resolved. Hence they do not even dream that there is sorrow in heaven as well as joy, the deep grief of having to deny the learner what he yearns for with all his heart, of having to deny him precisely because he is the beloved.”
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~Source: Philosophical Fragments, Or A Fragment Of Philosophy (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

November 26

“…Without purity no human being can see God and without becoming a sinner no human being can come to know him.”
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~Source: Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions: “On the Occasion of a Confession” (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 25

“O my God, how often have I not rejoiced, given thanks, been unspeakably grateful in discovering how wondrously events have been ordered…”
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~Source: Upbuilding Discourses (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 24

“Most people lead far too sheltered lives, and for that reason they get to know God so little. They have permanent appointments, they never exert themselves to the utmost, they have the solace of wife and children. I shall never talk disparagingly of that happiness, but I believe it my task to do without all this. Why should what we read again and again in the New Testament not be granted to us? But the unfortunate thing is that people have no idea at all of what it means to be a Christian, and that is why I am left without sympathy, that is why I am not understood.”
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~Source: The Journals (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 23

“When I was a child I was taught that they spat upon Christ. Now I am a poor and lowly person and a sinner, so will no doubt get off more lightly. This, you see, is the Christian syllogism, not the priestly nonsense which says: Be good, amicable, and unselfish and people will love you — for Christ, who was love, was loved by men… In eternity, there are none who will be judged as severely as these professional priests. They are, from an eternal point of view, what prostitutes are in temporality.”
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~Source: The Journals (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 22

“For faith is this paradox, that the particular is higher than the universal–yet in such a way, be it observed, that the movement repeats itself, and that consequently the individual, after having been in the universal, now as the particular isolates himself as higher than the universal. It this be not faith, then Abraham is lost, then faith has never existed in the world–because it has always existed.”
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~Source: Fear and Trembling (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 21

“It is difficult for a camel to go through the eye of a needle and difficult for the man of the world to find stillness; whether he is powerful or insignificant, it is difficult to find stillness in life’s noise… [and] whoever says that this stillness does not exist is merely making noise. Have you ever really heard that anyone in stillness made up his mind that it does not exist, even though you probably have heard big words and loud talk and noisy doings to get rid of stillness in order to have, instead of conscience and stillness and God’s voice delivering judgment in stillness, a nature-echo from the crowd, a confused collective scream, a general opinion in which one, out of cowardice, fearing for oneself, is not alone. But you, my listener, if you fear this stillness, even though you are doing your best to have a conscience (without stillness conscience does not exist at all) and to have a good conscience, then keep on, then endure it; this stillness is not the stillness of death in which you perish, it is not the sickness unto death — it is the transition to life.”
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~Source: Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions: “On the Occasion of a Confession” (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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