January 31

“Why did Kant begin with quantity, Hegel with quality?”
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~Source: The Journals (1842)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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January 30

“Oh, the sins of passion and of the heart — how much nearer to salvation than the sins of reason!”
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~Source: The Journals (18??)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 29

“If it is certain that death exists, which it is; if it is certain that with death’s decision all is over; if it is certain that death itself never becomes involved in giving any explanation — well, then it is a matter of understanding oneself, and the earnest understanding is that if death is night then life is day, that if no work can be done at night then work can be done during the day; and the terse but impelling cry of earnestness, like death’s terse cry, is: This very day.”
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~Source: Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions: “At a Graveside” (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 28

“My grief is my castle, which like an eagle’s nest is built high up on the mountain peaks among the clouds; nothing can storm it. From it I fly down into reality to seize my prey; but I do not remain down there, I bring it home with me, and this prey is a picture I weave into the tapestries of my palace. There I live as one dead. I immerse everything I have experienced in a baptism of forgetfulness unto an eternal remembrance. Everything finite and accidental is forgotten and erased. Then I sit like an old man, grey-haired and thoughtful, and explain the pictures in a voice as soft as a whisper; and at my side a child sits and listens, although he remembers everything before I tell it.”
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~Source: Either/Or: A Fragment of Life (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 27

“People reproach others for fearing God too much. Quite rightly, for in order really to love God it is necessary to have feared God; the bourgeois’ love of God begins when vegetable life is most active, when the hands are comfortably folded on the stomach, and the head sinks back into the cushions of the chair, while the eyes, drunk with sleep, gaze heavily for a moment toward the ceiling.”
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~Source: The Journals (1837)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 26

“The greater honesty in even the bitterest attacks on Christianity in the past lay in the fact that they left it reasonably clear what Christianity is. The danger with Hegel was that he changed Christianity — and by doing so got it to conform with his philosophy. It is characteristic of an age of reason in general not to let the task remain intact and say, No, but to change it and say, Yes, why bless me, we are in agreement. The hypocrisy of reason is infinitely insidious. That is why it is so difficult to catch sight of.”
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~Source: The Journals (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 25

“Insofar as the learner exists he is already created, and hence God must have endowed him with the condition for understanding the Truth. For otherwise his earlier existence must have been merely brutish, and the Teacher who gave him the Truth and with it the condition was the original creator of his human nature.”
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~Source: Philosophical Fragments, Or A Fragment Of Philosophy (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

January 24

“Knowledge about God being love is not yet the consciousness of it. For to have consciousness, a personal consciousness, it is requisite that in my knowing I have at the same time knowledge of myself and of my relationship to my knowing. This is to believe that God is love, it is to love Him.”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “All Things Must Serve for Good — When We Love God” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 23

“A theological professor who, with the help of everything that has been written earlier about it, has written a new book on the demonstrations of the truth of Christianity, would feel insulted if someone would not admit that it was now demonstrated; Christ himself, however, says no more than that the demonstrations are able to lead someone — not to faith, far from it, but to the point where faith can come into existence, are able to help someone to become aware and to that extent help him to come into the dialectical tension from which faith breaks forth: will you believe or will you be offended.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity: “The Exposition – B” (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

January 22

“In making a great decision, in the publication of a work which will presumably transform the world, in time of earthquakes, at golden-wedding festivities, in perils of the sea, and in the connection with a clandestine birth, the name of God is perhaps used quite as often by way of ejaculation as religiously.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

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