August 31

“It is so impossible for the world to exist without God that if God could forget it it would instantly cease to be.”
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~Source: The Journals (1837)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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August 30

“Someone out in a blizzard dressed in the lightest summer clothes is not as exposed as one who wills to be a solitary human being in a world where everything is alliance and accordingly, with the selfishness of the alliance, demands that one ally oneself with it until the individual protects himself against several alliances by becoming a member of one alliance, whereas the solitary, as soon as it has become obvious that he does not wish to enter into alliance with anyone, has all the alliances, joined together as one — a grandiose alliance! — against him.”
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~Source: Judge for Yourself!: “Christ as the Prototype” (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

August 29

“Now in case a man were able to maintain himself upon the pinnacle of the instant choice, in case he could cease to be a man, in case he were in his inmost nature only an airy thought, in case personality meant nothing more than to be a kobold, which takes part indeed in the movements, but nevertheless remains unchanged; in case such were the situation, it would be foolish to say that it might ever be too late for a man to choose, for in a deeper sense there could be no question of a choice.”
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~Source: Either/Or: A Fragment of Life (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Victor Eremita

August 28

“It is, in the literary world, customary to take a holy vow… Accordingly I swear: as soon as possible to realize a plan contemplated for thirty years to publish a logical System, as soon as possible to honor my vow taken ten years ago concerning an aesthetic System; furthermore I promise an ethical and dogmatic System, and finally the System. As soon as this has been published, future generations will not even need to learn to write, for there will be nothing further to write, but only to read — the System.”
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~Source: Prefaces: Light Reading for Certain Classes as the Occasion May Require (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Nicolaus Notabene

August 27

“I stick my finger into the world — it has no smell. Where am I? What does it mean to say: the world? What is the meaning of that word? Who tricked me into this whole thing and leaves me standing here? Who am I? How did I get into the world? Why was I not asked about it, why was I not informed of the rules and regulations but just thrust into the ranks as if I had been bought from a peddling shanghaier of human beings? How did I get involved in this big enterprise called actuality? Why should I be involved? Isn’t it a matter of choice? And if I am compelled to be involved, where is the manager — I have something to say about this. Is there no manager? To whom shall I make my complaint? After all, life is a debate — may I ask that my observations be considered?”
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~Source: Repetition: A Venture in Experimenting Psychology (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Constantin Constantius

August 26

People have mutually confirmed one another in the notion that by the aid of the upshot of Christ’s life and 1,800 years (the consequences) they have become acquainted with the answer to the problem. By degrees, as this came to be accounted wisdom, all pith and vigor was distilled out of Christianity; the tension of the paradox was relaxed, one became a Christian without noticing it, and without in the least noticing the possibility of offense.”
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~Source: Practice In Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

August 25

So-called pantheistic systems have often been characterized and challenged by the assertion that they abrogate the distinction between good and evil, and destroy freedom. Perhaps one would express oneself quite as definitely if one said that every such system fantastically dissipates the concept existence. But we ought to say this not merely of pantheistic systems; it would be more to the point to show that every system must be pantheistic precisely on account of its finality.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

August 23

“Then you acknowledged in all humility that God had certainly not deceived you, since He accepted you, since He accepted your earthly wishes and foolish desires, exchanged them for you and gave you instead heavenly consolation and holy thoughts; that He did not treat you unfairly when He denied you your wish, but for compensation created this faith in your heart; when instead of the wish, which even if it could do everything was at most able to give you the whole world, He gave you faith through which you gained God and overcame the whole world.”
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~Source: Two Upbuilding Discourses (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

August 21

“Were I allowed to make a wish, then I would ask that no reader would be so profound as to ask: What if Adam had not sinned? … The foolishness of the above question consists not so much in the question itself as in the fact that it is directed to science. Every science lies either in a logical immanence or an immanence within a transcendence that it is unable to explain. Now sin is precisely that transcendence, that discrimen rerum [crisis] in which sin enters into the single individual as the single individual… If any science could explain it, everything would be confused… That the admired men of science in my most honored contemporary age, men whose concern in their search after the system is known to the whole congregation and who are concerned also to find a place for sin within it, may find the above position highly unscientific is entirely in order.”
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~Source: The Concept of Anxiety (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Vigilius Haufniensis

August 19

“Along with the growing sensibleness [of this enlightened age] there is an increase of a certain kind of knowledge about human nature: information about how we human beings are now or are at this time, a natural-scientific, statistical knowledge about the human moral state as a natural product, explained by the situation, the air currents, the wind, the rainfall, the tides, etc. … the stock exchange rate, the market price — in order, through sagacious familiarity with this information, to be able both to protect oneself against and to make use of people, to score a success, to win advantages in this world, or to be able to defend and explain away one’s own contemptibleness and mediocrity. … But about how we human beings ought to be, about God’s requirement, about ideals — as sensibleness increases, less and less is heard about that.”
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~Source: Judge for Yourself!: “Christ as the Prototype” (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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