November 30

“There is only one proof of the truth of Christianity and that, quite rightly, is from the emotions, when the dread of sin and a heavy conscience torture a man into crossing the narrow line between despair bordering upon madness — and Christendom.

There lies Christianity.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Journals (1849)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

Advertisements

November 28

“Fools and young men prate about everything being possible for a man. That, however, is a great error. Spiritually speaking, everything is possible, but in the world of the finite there is much which is not possible. This impossible, however, the knight makes possible by expressing it spiritually, but he expresses it spiritually by waiving his claim to it. The wish which would carry him into reality, but was wrecked upon the impossibility, is now bent inward, but it is not therefore lost, neither is it forgotten.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

November 27

“The minds of men so often yearn for might and power, and their thoughts are constantly being drawn to such things, as if by their attainment all mysteries would be resolved. Hence they do not even dream that there is sorrow in heaven as well as joy, the deep grief of having to deny the learner what he yearns for with all his heart, of having to deny him precisely because he is the beloved.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Philosophical Fragments, Or A Fragment Of Philosophy (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus of men so often yearn for might and power, and their thoughts are constantly being drawn to such things, as if by their attainment all mysteries would be resolved. Hence they do not even dream that there is sorrow in heaven as well as joy, the deep grief of having to deny the learner what he yearns for with all his heart, of having to deny him precisely because he is the beloved.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Philosophical Fragments, Or A Fragment Of Philosophy (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

November 25

“O my God, how often have I not rejoiced, given thanks, been unspeakably grateful in discovering how wondrously events have been ordered…”
——————————————————–

~Source: Upbuilding Discourses (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 24

“Philosophy has answered every question; but no adequate consideration has been given the question concerning what sphere it is within which each question finds its answer. This creates a greater confusion in the world of the spirit than when in the civic life an ecclesiastical question, let us say, is handled by the bridge commission.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

November 23

“When I was a child I was taught that they spat upon Christ. Now I am a poor and lowly person and a sinner, so will no doubt get off more lightly. This, you see, is the Christian syllogism, not the priestly nonsense which says: Be good, amicable, and unselfish and people will love you — for Christ, who was love, was loved by men… In eternity, there are none who will be judged as severely as these professional priests. They are, from an eternal point of view, what prostitutes are in temporality.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Journals (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 21

“It is difficult for a camel to go through the eye of a needle and difficult for the man of the world to find stillness; whether he is powerful or insignificant, it is difficult to find stillness in life’s noise… [and] whoever says that this stillness does not exist is merely making noise. Have you ever really heard that anyone in stillness made up his mind that it does not exist, even though you probably have heard big words and loud talk and noisy doings to get rid of stillness in order to have, instead of conscience and stillness and God’s voice delivering judgment in stillness, a nature-echo from the crowd, a confused collective scream, a general opinion in which one, out of cowardice, fearing for oneself, is not alone. But you, my listener, if you fear this stillness, even though you are doing your best to have a conscience (without stillness conscience does not exist at all) and to have a good conscience, then keep on, then endure it; this stillness is not the stillness of death in which you perish, it is not the sickness unto death — it is the transition to life.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Three Discourses on Imagined Occasions: “On the Occasion of a Confession” (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 20

“Experience, it is said, makes a man wise. That is very silly talk. If there were nothing beyond experience it would simply drive him mad.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Journals (1842)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

NOVEMBER 13

“Everyone takes his revenge on the world. My revenge consists in bearing my distress and anguish enclosed deeply within me while my laughter entertains everyone. If I see someone suffer I give him my sympathy, console him as best I can, and listen to him calmly when he assures me that I am fortunate. If I can only keep this up until the day I die I shall have had my revenge.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Journals (1837)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

November 12

“Desperate as he was, he thought: lost is lost. But he could not help turning around once more in his longing for the Good. How terribly embittered he had become against this very longing, a longing which reveals that, just as man in all his defiance has not power enough wholly to loose himself from the Good, because it is the stronger, so he has not even the power wholly to will it.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Upbuilding Discourses in Various Spirits: “Purity of Heart is to Will One Thing” (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

« Older entries