March 31

“He who denies himself and sacrifices himself for duty gives up the finite in order to grasp the infinite, and that man is secure enough…But he who gives up the universal in order to grasp something still higher which is not the universal — what is he doing?”
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~Source: Fear and Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

March 30

“Every speech, especially a portion of a speech, usually presupposes something from which it proceeds. He who desires to make the speech or the assertion a subject of reflection does well, therefore, to look first for this presupposition, in order to start from it. So there is also a presupposition contained in the text we read, which although it comes last is nevertheless the starting point. Therefore when we are told: ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself,’ then this statement contains the presupposition that every man loves himself. Consequently Christianity presupposes this, since Christianity, unlike those ambitious thinkers*, by no means begins without presuppositions, or with a flattering assumption.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

* The Hegelians

March 29

“It is uncomplicated and beautiful and touching when a lover looks lovingly at the loved one, but most stylish to squint at her through a lorgnette. And the physicist uses the microscope just as a dandy uses the lorgnette, using only the microscope to see God.”
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~Source: The Journals (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

March 28

“In the constant sociability of our age people shudder at solitude to such a degree that they know no other use to put it to but (oh, admirable epigram!) as a punishment for criminals. But after all it is a fact that in our age it is a crime to have spirit, so it is natural that such people, the lovers of solitude, are included in the same class with criminals.”
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~Source: The Sickness Unto Death (1849)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

March 27

“So long as one is a child one has sufficient imagination, though it were for an hour in the dark room, to keep one’s soul on tiptoe, on the tiptoe of expectation; but when one is older, imagination easily has the effect of making one tired of the Christmas tree before one has a chance to see it.”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

March 25

“What I really lack is to be clear in my mind what I am to do, not what I am to know, except in so far as a certain understanding must precede every action. The thing is to understand myself, to see what God really wishes me to do; the thing is to find a truth which is true for me, to find the idea for which I can live and die.”
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~Source: The Journals (1835)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

March 24

“When a man enters upon the way, in a certain sense the hard way of the tragic hero, many will be able to give him counsel; to him who follows the narrow the way of faith no one can give him counsel, him no one can understand. Faith is a miracle, and yet no man is excluded from it; for that in which all human life is unified is passion, and faith is a passion.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

March 23

“Can one learn from history anything about Christ? No. Why not? Because one can ‘know’ nothing at all about ‘Christ’; He is the paradox, the object of faith, existing only for faith. But all historical communication is communication of ‘knowledge,’ hence from history one can learn nothing about Christ.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

March 21

“In order that everything should be reduced to the same level it is first of all necessary to procure a phantom, a spirit, a monstrous abstraction, an all-embracing something which is nothing, a mirage — and that phantom is the public. It is only in an age which is without passion, yet reflective, that such a phantom can develop itself with the help of the Press which itself becomes an abstraction.”

————————- ~Source: The Present Age: A Literary Review (1846) Author: Soren Kierkegaard

March 17

“He isn’t a man who tries to lead others astray; on the contrary he dissuades them from leading such a life. He has tasted its bitterness and puts up with it only because he lives for an idea…Rather I would think of such a master thief as someone who had lost his father early in life and now had only an old mother whom he dearly loves and she him, though she is horrified at her son’s errant ways, while his beloved quite overlooks his bad side…”
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~Source: The Journals (1835)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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