June 19

“The abstract leveling process, that self-combustion of the human race, produced by the friction which arises when the individual ceases to exist as singled out by religion, is bound to continue, like a trade wind, and consume everything. But through it each individual for himself may receive once more a religious education and, in the highest sense, be helped by the examen rigorosum of the leveling process to an essentially religious attitude. For the younger men who, however strongly they personally may cling to what they admire as eminent, realize from the beginning that the leveling process is evil in both the selfish individual and in the selfish generation, but that it can also, if they desire it honestly and before God, become the starting point for the highest life — for them it will indeed be an education to live in the age of leveling.”
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~Source: The Present Age: A Literary Review (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 18

“Does God in heaven take the good gifts and hide them for us in heaven so that we may sometime receive them in the next world?…Perhaps you spoke in this way in your heart’s bewilderment. You did not demand that for your sake there should be given signs and wonderful manifestations, you did not childishly demand that every one of your wishes should be fulfilled; only you begged for a testimony early and late, for your soul treasured one wish.”
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~Source: Two Upbuilding Discourses (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 16

“In unconsciousness of being in despair a man is farthest from being conscious of himself as spirit. But precisely the thing of not being conscious of oneself as spirit is despair, which is spiritlessness — whether the condition be that of complete deadness, a merely vegetative life, or a life of higher potency the secret of which is nevertheless despair. In the latter instance the man is like the sufferer from consumption: he feels well, considers himself in the best of health, seems perhaps to others to be in florid health, precisely when the sickness is most dangerous.”
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~Source: The Sickness Unto Death (1849)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

June 14

“The immediate love can be changed in itself, it can be changed into its opposite, into hate. Hate is a love which has become its opposite, a love which has perished… As it is said about the tongue, that ‘out of the same mouth proceedeth both blessing and cursing,’ so we must also say that it is the same love which loves and hates; but just because it is the same love, precisely therefore it is not in the eternal sense the true love which remains the same and unchanged, while that immediate love, if it is changed, at bottom is still the same. The true love, which underwent the change of the eternal by becoming duty, is never changed; it is simple, it loves–and never hates, never hates–the beloved”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 11

“Much is heard in the world about unhappy love, and we all know what this means: the lovers are prevented from realizing their union, the causes being many and various. There exists another kind of unhappy love, the theme of our present discourse, for which there is no perfect earthly parallel, though by dint of speaking foolishly a little while we may make shift to conceive it through an earthly figure. The unhappiness of this love does not come from the inability of the lovers to realize their union, but from their inability to understand one another.”
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~Source: Philosophical Fragments (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

June 6

“Love (true love, not self-love which only loves the remarkable, the brilliant and consequently really loves itself) stands in inverse ratio to the greatness and excellence of the object. And so if I am of infinitely, infinitely little importance, if in my wretchedness I feel myself to be the most miserable of all: then it is eternally, eternally certain that God loves me.”
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~Source: The Journals (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 3

“Would it not be better to stop with faith, and is it not revolting that everybody wants to go further?… Would it not be better that they should stand still at faith, and that he who stands should take heed lest he fall? For movements of faith must constantly be made by virtue of the absurd, yet in such a way, be it observed, that one does not lose the finite but gains it every inch. For my part I can well describe the movements of faith, but I cannot make them.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes de Silentio

June 2

“Save me, O God, from ever being completely sure; keep me unsure until the end so that then, if I receive eternal blessedness, I might be completely sure that I have it by grace! It is empty shadowboxing to give assurances that one believes it is by grace — and then to be completely sure. The true, the essential expression of its being by grace is the very fear and trembling of unsureness. There lies faith.”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “Resurrection of the Dead” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 1

“When a person has been taught that hail and crop failures are to be ascribed to the devil, this may be very well meant, but such a teaching is essentially a cleverness that weakens the concept of evil and introduces into it an almost jesting note, just as, esthetically, it is jest to speak of a stupid devil. So when dealing with the concept of faith the historical is made so one-sidedly significant that the primitive originality of the faith in the individual is overlooked, faith becomes a finite pettiness instead of a free infinitude. The consequence is that faith may come to be regarded in the manner of Hieronymus in Holberg’s play, when he says about Erasmus Montanus that he has heretical views of faith because he believes that the earth is round and not flat, as one generation after another in the village had believed. Thus a person might become a heretic in his faith by wearing wide pants when everyone else in the village wears tight pants. When someone offers statistical surveys of the proportions of sinfulness, draws a map of it in color and relief, so as to guide the eye quickly in its perspicuity, he makes an attempt at treating sin as a peculiarity of nature that is not to be annulled but is to be calculated just as the atmospheric pressure and rainfall are. The mean and the arithmetical average that result are nonsense of a kind that has no comparison in the purely empirical sciences. It would be a very ridiculous abracadabra if anyone should seriously suggest that sinfulness averages 3.375 inches in every man or that in Languedoc the average is merely 2.25 inches, while in Bretagne it is 3.875.”
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~Source: The Concept of Anxiety (1844)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Vigilius Haufniensis