November 1

Imagine a gathering of worldly-minded, timorous people whose highest law in everything is a slavish regard for what others, what ‘they’ will say and judge, whose sole concern is that unchristian concern that ‘everywhere they speak well’ of them, whose admired goal is to be just like the others, whose sole inspiring and whose sole terrifying idea is the majority, the crowd, its approval — its disapproval. Imagine such an assembly or crowd of worshipers and devotees of the fear of people, that is, an assembly of the honored and esteemed (why should such people not honor and esteem one another — to honor the other is, after all, to flatter oneself!) — and imagine that this assembly is supposed (yes, as it is in a comedy), is supposed to be Christians. Before this Christian assembly a sermon is delivered on these words: It is blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!

But it is blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!”

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~Source: Christian Discourses: “But It Is Blessed to Be Mocked” (1848)

Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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February 26

“Ordinarily everyone who lives in Christendom has unconditionally enough knowledge about Christianity to be able to invoke and supplicate, to be able to turn in prayer to Christ. If he does that with the need of inwardness and in honesty of heart, he surely will become a believer. If only it is altogether definite before God that this person feels the need to believe, he will very definitely find out what he is to believe. The opposite is: without a need to believe, to go on researching, ruminating, and pondering, more and more wanting nigglingly to waste year after year of one’s life, and finally one’s eternal salvation, on getting absolutely and precisely definite, down to a dot over a letter, what one is to believe. This opposite is empty shadowboxing that merely becomes more and more self-important, or it is a scholarly, learned practice in the wrong place, therefore a scholarly, learned malpractice, or it is cowardly, inhuman, and to that extent also ungodly pusillanimity.”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “He Was Believed in the World” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 15

“Who has more: the one who has God and also something else, or the one who, deprived of everything else, has God alone? Surely the latter, since ‘all else is loss.’* But who was deprived of more? The one who received not what was his right but mockery as his reward; the only thing a person has essentially is the right he has–he has everything else only accidentally; therefore it is not really his possession. The one who is mocked is deprived of everything; isolated from human society, he has only God–he the richest of all. He has only God–how blessed ot be alone in having God. Praised be all the persecution, the scorn, the mockery that taught him, that compelled him, to be alone with God, to have only God–how blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “But It Is Blessed–to Suffer Mockery for a Good Cause” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

*Philippians 3:8

January 11

“Imagine a gathering of worldly-minded, timorous people whose highest law in everything is a slavish regard for what others, what ‘they’ will say and judge, whose sole concern is that unchristian concern that ‘everywhere they speak well’ of them, whose admired goal is to be just like the others, whose sole inspiring and whose sole terrifying idea is the majority, the crowd, its approval — its disapproval. Imagine such an assembly or crowd of worshipers and devotees of the fear of people, that is, an assembly of the honored and esteemed (why should such people not honor and esteem one another — to honor the other is, after all, to flatter oneself!) — and imagine that this assembly is supposed (yes, as it is in a comedy), is supposed to be Christians. Before this Christian assembly a sermon is delivered on these words: It is blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!

But it is blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!”
——————————————————–

~Source: Christian Discourses: “But It Is Blessed to Be Mocked” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 11

“Ordinarily everyone who lives in Christendom has unconditionally enough knowledge about Christianity to be able to invoke and supplicate, to be able to turn in prayer to Christ. If he does that with the need of inwardness and in honesty of heart, he surely will become a believer. If only it is altogether definite before God that this person feels the need to believe, he will very definitely find out what he is to believe. The opposite is: without a need to believe, to go on researching, ruminating, and pondering, more and more wanting nigglingly to waste year after year of one’s life, and finally one’s eternal salvation, on getting absolutely and precisely definite, down to a dot over a letter, what one is to believe. This opposite is empty shadowboxing that merely becomes more and more self-important, or it is a scholarly, learned practice in the wrong place, therefore a scholarly, learned malpractice, or it is cowardly, inhuman, and to that extent also ungodly pusillanimity.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Christian Discourses: “He Was Believed in the World” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 4

“Imagine a gathering of worldly-minded, timorous people whose highest law in everything is a slavish regard for what others, what ‘they’ will say and judge, whose sole concern is that unchristian concern that ‘everywhere they speak well’ of them, whose admired goal is to be just like the others, whose sole inspiring and whose sole terrifying idea is the majority, the crowd, its approval — its disapproval. Imagine such an assembly or crowd of worshipers and devotees of the fear of people, that is, an assembly of the honored and esteemed (why should such people not honor and esteem one another — to honor the other is, after all, to flatter oneself!) — and imagine that this assembly is supposed (yes, as it is in a comedy), is supposed to be Christians. Before this Christian assembly a sermon is delivered on these words: It is blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!

But it is blessed to suffer mockery for a good cause!”
——————————————————–

~Source: Christian Discourses: “But It Is Blessed to Be Mocked” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 2

“Save me, O God, from ever being completely sure; keep me unsure until the end so that then, if I receive eternal blessedness, I might be completely sure that I have it by grace! It is empty shadowboxing to give assurances that one believes it is by grace — and then to be completely sure. The true, the essential expression of its being by grace is the very fear and trembling of unsureness. There lies faith.”
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~Source: Christian Discourses: “Resurrection of the Dead” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

April 15

“Ordinarily everyone who lives in Christendom has unconditionally enough knowledge about Christianity to be able to invoke and supplicate, to be able to turn in prayer to Christ. If he does that with the need of inwardness and in honesty of heart, he surely will become a believer. If only it is altogether definite before God that this person feels the need to believe, he will very definitely find out what he is to believe. The opposite is: without a need to believe, to go on researching, ruminating, and pondering, more and more wanting nigglingly to waste year after year of one’s life, and finally one’s eternal salvation, on getting absolutely and precisely definite, down to a dot over a letter, what one is to believe. This opposite is empty shadowboxing that merely becomes more and more self-important, or it is a scholarly, learned practice in the wrong place, therefore a scholarly, learned malpractice, or it is cowardly, inhuman, and to that extent also ungodly pusillanimity.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Christian Discourses: “He Was Believed in the World” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

February 26

“Ordinarily everyone who lives in Christendom has unconditionally enough knowledge about Christianity to be able to invoke and supplicate, to be able to turn in prayer to Christ. If he does that with the need of inwardness and in honesty of heart, he surely will become a believer. If only it is altogether definite before God that this person feels the need to believe, he will very definitely find out what he is to believe. The opposite is: without a need to believe, to go on researching, ruminating, and pondering, more and more wanting nigglingly to waste year after year of one’s life, and finally one’s eternal salvation, on getting absolutely and precisely definite, down to a dot over a letter, what one is to believe. This opposite is empty shadowboxing that merely becomes more and more self-important, or it is a scholarly, learned practice in the wrong place, therefore a scholarly, learned malpractice, or it is cowardly, inhuman, and to that extent also ungodly pusillanimity.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Christian Discourses: “He Was Believed in the World” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

February 14

Save me, O God, from ever being completely sure; keep me unsure until the end so that then, if I receive eternal blessedness, I might be completely sure that I have it by grace! It is empty shadowboxing to give assurances that one believes it is by grace — and then to be completely sure. The true, the essential expression of its being by grace is the very fear and trembling of unsureness. There lies faith.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Christian Discourses: “Resurrection of the Dead” (1848)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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