September 30

“The Socratic ignorance is the expression for the objective uncertainty; the inwardness of the existing individual is the truth. To anticipate here what will be developed later, let me make the following remark: the Socratic ignorance is an analogue to the category of the absurd, only that there is still less objective certainty in the repellent effect that the absurd exercises. It is certain only that it is absurd, and precisely on that account it incites to an infinitely greater tension in the corresponding inwardness.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

September 6

“Persistent striving is the ethical life view of an existing subject.”

———————————————————————- ~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

September 5

“The paradoxical character of the truth is its objective uncertainty; this uncertainty is an expression for the passionate inwardness, and this passion is precisely the truth. So far the Socratic principle. The eternal and essential truth, the truth which has an essential relationship to an existing individual because it pertains essentially to existence (all other knowledge being from the Socratic point of view accidental, its scope and degree a matter of indifference), is a paradox. But the eternal essential truth is by no means in itself a paradox; it becomes paradoxical by virtue of its relationship to an existing individual.”

———————————————— ~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

August 25

So-called pantheistic systems have often been characterized and challenged by the assertion that they abrogate the distinction between good and evil, and destroy freedom. Perhaps one would express oneself quite as definitely if one said that every such system fantastically dissipates the concept existence. But we ought to say this not merely of pantheistic systems; it would be more to the point to show that every system must be pantheistic precisely on account of its finality.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

August 15

“Here is the difficulty. For unless, in disingenuousness or in thoughtlessness or in breathless haste to get the System finished, we let this one thought slip away from us, it is, in all simplicity, sufficient to decide that no existential system is possible; and that no logical system may boast of an absolute beginning, since such a beginning, like pure being, is a pure chimera.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments”
Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

August 14

Is not ‘bad’ an ethical category? What is the implication involved in speaking of a bad infinite? The implication is that I told some person
responsible for refusing to end the infinite reflective process. And this means, does it not, that I require him to do something? But as a genuinely speculative philosopher I assume, on the contrary, that reflection ends itself. If that is the case, why do I make any demand upon the thinker? And what is it that I require of him? I ask him for a resolve.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments”
Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

July 8

“Aye, just as it must be terrible for one who is thought to be dead while he still lives, and has the power of sensation, and can hear what those present say about him, but is unable in any way to express that he is still alive, so also for the religious individual is the suffering of his annihilation a fearful thing, when he has the absolute conception present with him in his nothingness, but no mutuality.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

June 29

“If God were to reveal Himself in human form and grant a direct relationship by giving Himself, for example, the figure of a man six yards tall, then our hypothetical society man and captain of the hunt would doubtless have his attention aroused. But the spiritual relationship to God in truth, when God refuses to deceive, requires just that there be nothing remarkable about the figure, so that the society man would have to say: ‘There is nothing whatever to see.'”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

June 21

“To hold the fate of many human beings in one’s hand, to transform the world, and then constantly understand that this is a jest: aye, that is earnestness indeed! But in order that this should be possible all finite passions must be atrophied, all selfishness outrooted, both the selfishness which wants to have everything, and the selfishness which proudly turns its back on everything. But just herein sticks the difficulty, and here arises the suffering in the dying away from self; and while it is the specific criterion of the ethical that is so easy to understand in its abstract expression, it is correspondingly difficult to understand in concreto.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

May 21

“The realm of faith is thus not a class for numskulls in the sphere of the intellectual, or an asylum for the feeble-minded. Faith constitutes a sphere all by itself, and every misunderstanding of Christianity may at once be recognized by its transforming it into a doctrine, transferring it to the sphere of the intellectual. The maximum of attainment within the sphere of the intellectual, namely, to become completely indifferent as to the reality of the teacher, is in the sphere of faith at the opposite end of the scale. The maximum of attainment within the sphere of faith is to become infinitely interested in the reality of the teacher…”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments”
Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

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