September 8

“But a ubiquitous person is one who is seen everywhere, like a policeman, for example: how deceptive then, that an omnipresent being should be recognized precisely be being invisible, only and alone recognizable by this trait, since his visibility would annul his omnipresence. The relationship between invisibility and omnipresence is like the relation between mystery and revelation.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

September 6

“Persistent striving is the ethical life view of an existing subject.” ———————————————————————- ~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

July 29

“The object of faith is the reality of the teacher, that the teacher really exists. The answer of faith is therefore unconditionally yes or no. For the answer of faith is not concerned as to whether a doctrine is true or not, nor with respect to a teacher, whether his teaching is true or not; it is the answer to a question concerning a fact: ‘Do you or do you not suppose that he has really existed?’ And the answer, it must be noted, is with infinite passion.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

May 16

“The existing individual becomes concrete in his experience, and in going on he still has his experience with him, and hence may at any moment lose it; he has it with him not as something one has in a pocket, but his having it constitutes a definite something by which he is himself specifically determined, so that by losing it he loses his own specific determination.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

May 11

“An existential system cannot be formulated. Does this mean that no such system exists? By no means; nor is it implied in our assertion. Existence itself is a system — for God; but it cannot be a system for any existing spirit. System and finality correspond to one another, but existence is precisely the opposite of finality.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments”
Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus (1846)

April 21

“To hold the fate of many human beings in one’s hand, to transform the world, and then constantly understand that this is a jest: aye, that is earnestness indeed! But in order that this should be possible all finite passions must be atrophied, all selfishness outrooted, both the selfishness which wants to have everything, and the selfishness which proudly turns its back on everything. But just herein sticks the difficulty, and here arises the suffering in the dying away from self; and while it is the specific criterion of the ethical that is so easy to understand in its abstract expression, it is correspondingly difficult to understand in concreto.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

February 6

“All ironical observations depend upon paying attention to the ‘how,’ whereas the gentleman with whom the ironist has the honor to converse is attentive only to the ‘what.’ A man protests loudly and solemnly, ‘This is my opinion.’ However, he does not confine himself to delivering this formula verbatim, he explains himself further, he ventures to vary the expressions. Yes, for it is not so easy to vary as one thinks it is.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

February 4

“All ironical observations depend upon paying attention to the ‘how,’ whereas the gentleman with whom the ironist has the honor to converse is attentive only to the ‘what.’ A man protests loudly and solemnly, ‘This is my opinion.’ However, he does not confine himself to delivering this formula verbatim, he explains himself further, he ventures to vary the expressions. Yes, for it is not so easy to vary as one thinks it is.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

November 24

“Philosophy has answered every question; but no adequate consideration has been given the question concerning what sphere it is within which each question finds its answer. This creates a greater confusion in the world of the spirit than when in the civic life an ecclesiastical question, let us say, is handled by the bridge commission.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

October 24

“Philosophy has answered every question; but no adequate consideration has been given the question concerning what sphere it is within which each question finds its answer. This creates a greater confusion in the world of the spirit than when in the civic life an ecclesiastical question, let us say, is handled by the bridge commission.”
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~Source: Concluding Unscientific Postscript To The “Philosophical Fragments” (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes Climacus

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