August 3

“Fools and young men prate about everything being possible for a man. That, however, is a great error. Spiritually speaking, everything is possible, but in the world of the finite there is much which is not possible. This impossible, however, the knight makes possible by expressing it spiritually, but he expresses it spiritually by waiving his claim to it. The wish which would carry him into reality, but was wrecked upon the impossibility, is now bent inward, but it is not therefore lost, neither is it forgotten.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

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July 23

“However, in our time people concern themselves rather little about making pure movements. In case one who was about to learn to dance were to say, ‘For centuries now one generation after another has been learning positions, it is high time I drew some advantage out of this and began straightway with the French dances’–then people will laugh at him; but in the world of spirit they find this exceedingly plausible. What is education? I should suppose that education was the curriculum one had to run through in order to catch up with oneself, and he who will not pass through this curriculum is helped very little by the fact that he was born in the most enlightened age.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

June 3

“Would it not be better to stop with faith, and is it not revolting that everybody wants to go further?… Would it not be better that they should stand still at faith, and that he who stands should take heed lest he fall? For movements of faith must constantly be made by virtue of the absurd, yet in such a way, be it observed, that one does not lose the finite but gains it every inch. For my part I can well describe the movements of faith, but I cannot make them.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes de Silentio

April 29

“The knights of the infinite resignation are easily recognized: their gait is gliding and assured. Those on the other hand who carry the jewel of faith are likely to be delusive, because their outward appearance bears a striking resemblance to that which both the infinite resignation and faith profoundly despise — to Philistinism.”
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~Source: Fear and Trembling (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

March 24

“When a man enters upon the way, in a certain sense the hard way of the tragic hero, many will be able to give him counsel; to him who follows the narrow the way of faith no one can give him counsel, him no one can understand. Faith is a miracle, and yet no man is excluded from it; for that in which all human life is unified is passion, and faith is a passion.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

February 22

“In resignation I make renunciation of everything; this movement I make by myself, and if I do not make it, it is because I am cowardly and effeminate and without enthusiasm and do not feel the significance of the lofty dignity which is assigned to every man, that of being his own censor, which is a far prouder title than that of Censor General to the whole Roman Republic. This movement I make by myself, and what I gain is myself in my eternal consciousness, in blissful agreement with my love for the Eternal Being.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

February 17

“So for the first thing, the knight will have power to concentrate the whole content of life and the whole significance of reality into a single wish. If a man lacks this concentration, this intensity, if his soul from the beginning is dispersed in the multifarious, he never comes to the point of making the movement; he will deal shrewdly in life like the capitalists who invest their money in all sorts of securities, so as to gain on the one what they lose on the other — in short, he is not a knight at all.”
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~Source: Fear And Trembling (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

January 20

“No! No one shall be forgotten who was great in this world; but everyone was great in his own way, and everyone in proportion to the greatness of what he loved.”
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~Source: Fear and Trembling (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

November 28

“Fools and young men prate about everything being possible for a man. That, however, is a great error. Spiritually speaking, everything is possible, but in the world of the finite there is much which is not possible. This impossible, however, the knight makes possible by expressing it spiritually, but he expresses it spiritually by waiving his claim to it. The wish which would carry him into reality, but was wrecked upon the impossibility, is now bent inward, but it is not therefore lost, neither is it forgotten.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

October 23

“In the infinite resignation there is peace and rest; every man who will, who has not abased himself by scorning himself (which is still more dreadful than being proud) can train himself to make these movements. The infinite resignation is that shirt we read about in the old fable. The thread is spun under tears, the cloth bleached with tears, the shirt sewn with tears; but then too it is a better protection than iron and steel. The imperfection in the fable is that a third party can manufacture this shirt. The secret in life is that everyone must sew it for himself, and the astonishing thing is that a man can sew it fully as well as a woman.” ————————————————- ~Source: Fear And Trembling: A Dialectical Lyric (1843) Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Johannes De Silentio

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