January 2

“The print of a foot along a path is obviously a consequence of the fact that some creature has gone that way. I may now go on to suppose erroneously that it was, for example, a bird, but on closer inspection, pursuing the track farther, I convince myself that it must have been another sort of animal. Very well. But here we are far from having an infinite qualitative alteration. But can I, by closer inspection of such a track, or by following it farther, reach at one point or another the conclusion: ergo it was a spirit that passed this way? A spirit which leaves no trace behind it! Just so it is with this thing of concluding from the consequences of an (assumed) human existence that ergo it was God.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

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May12

“Eighteen hundred years have not contributed a jot to demonstrating the truth of Christianity; on the contrary, with steadily increasing power they have contributed to abolishing Christianity… Now, since it has been demonstrated, and on an enormous scale, that Christianity is the truth, now there is no one, almost no one, who is willing to make any sacrifice for its sake… If only it could be made evident to all those orators who demonstrate the truth of Christianity by the eighteen hundred years and win people, if only it could be made evident to them, frightful as it is, that they are betraying, denying, abolishing Christianity — if that cannot be done, then Christianity is abolished.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

March 23

“Can one learn from history anything about Christ? No. Why not? Because one can ‘know’ nothing at all about ‘Christ’; He is the paradox, the object of faith, existing only for faith. But all historical communication is communication of ‘knowledge,’ hence from history one can learn nothing about Christ.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

August 26

People have mutually confirmed one another in the notion that by the aid of the upshot of Christ’s life and 1,800 years (the consequences) they have become acquainted with the answer to the problem. By degrees, as this came to be accounted wisdom, all pith and vigor was distilled out of Christianity; the tension of the paradox was relaxed, one became a Christian without noticing it, and without in the least noticing the possibility of offense.”
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~Source: Practice In Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

May 12

“Eighteen hundred years have not contributed a jot to demonstrating the truth of Christianity; on the contrary, with steadily increasing power they have contributed to abolishing Christianity… Now, since it has been demonstrated, and on an enormous scale, that Christianity is the truth, now there is no one, almost no one, who is willing to make any sacrifice for its sake… If only it could be made evident to all those orators who demonstrate the truth of Christianity by the eighteen hundred years and win people, if only it could be made evident to them, frightful as it is, that they are betraying, denying, abolishing Christianity — if that cannot be done, then Christianity is abolished.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

March 23

Can one learn from history anything about Christ? No. Why not? Because one can ‘know’ nothing at all about ‘Christ’; He is the paradox, the object of faith, existing only for faith. But all historical communication is communication of ‘knowledge,’ hence from history one can learn nothing about Christ.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

February 13

“Are the consequences of Christ’s life more important than His life? No, by no means, quite the contrary — if this were so, Christ was merely a man.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

January 17

“To ‘prove’ is to demonstrate something to be the rational reality it is. Can one demonstrate that to be a rational reality which is at variance with reason? Surely not, unless one would contradict oneself. One can ‘prove’ only that it is at variance with reason. The proofs which Scripture presents for Christ’s divinity — His miracles, His Resurrection from the dead, His Ascension into heaven — are therefore only for faith, that is, they are not ‘proofs,’ they have no intention of proving that all this agrees perfectly with reason; on the contrary they would prove that it conflicts with reason and therefore is an object of faith.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

January 2

“The print of a foot along a path is obviously a consequence of the fact that some creature has gone that way. I may now go on to suppose erroneously that it was, for example, a bird, but on closer inspection, pursuing the track farther, I convince myself that it must have been another sort of animal. Very well. But here we are far from having an infinite qualitative alteration. But can I, by closer inspection of such a track, or by following it farther, reach at one point or another the conclusion: ergo it was a spirit that passed this way? A spirit which leaves no trace behind it! Just so it is with this thing of concluding from the consequences of an (assumed) human existence that ergo it was God.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

December 22

“Lord Jesus Christ, whether we are far away or nearby, far away from you in the confused human throng, in worldly busyness, in earthly cares, in temporal joy, in purely human loftiness, or far away from all this in solitude, in forsakenness, in unappreciation, in lowliness — and closer to you: draw us, draw us wholly to yourself.”
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~Source: Practice in Christianity (1850)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Anti-Climacus

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