February 11

“How poor a thing is language compared with the unmeaning yet significant combination of clangorous sounds in a battle or at a banquet, which not even a theatrical rendering can reproduce, and for which language possess but a few words! Yet how rich is language in the service of the wish, compared with its use for the description of reality.”
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~Source: Stages On Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

November 09

“A carriage stood ready at the door. At Constantine’s invitation they took their places and drove away in good spirits, for that tableau of destruction in the background had imparted a new elasticity to their souls.” —————————————————————- ~Source: Stages On Life’s Way: Studies By Sundry Persons (1845) Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

October 18

“A carriage stood ready at the door. At Constantine’s invitation they took their places and drove away in good spirits, for that tableau of destruction in the background had imparted a new elasticity to their souls.”
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~Source: Stages On Life’s Way: Studies By Sundry Persons (1845)
Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

September 04

“Who is there that knows the happy instant, who has comprehended the delight of it and has not sensed that dread lest something might suddenly occur, the most insignificant thing, yet with power to disturb it all! Who has held in his hand the magic lamp and yet not felt that swooning of delight at the thought that one only needs to wish? Who has held in his hand that which beckons and has not learned to keep his wrist supple so as to let it go at once?”

—— ~Source: Stages On Life’s Way: Studies By Sundry Persons (1845) Author: Soren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

August 16

“Constantine had it in mind that, driving thither in the dusk of the evening, they might get an inkling of what was coming. Even though one knows that one is driving to a banquet, and imagination endeavors for an instant to deal with the voluptuous thought, the impression made by natural surroundings is so powerful that it must prevail. That this might occur was Constantine’s only fear; for while there is no power which knows so well how to beautify all things as does imagination, neither is there any power which can so profoundly disturb everything when it fails one upon coming into contact with real life.”
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~Source: Stages On Life’s Way: Studies By Sundry Persons (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

August 09

“I require that the fruitfulness of the earth shall be at our service, as though everything were sprouting the very instant when appetite desires it. I require a more exuberant abundance of wine than Mephistopheles procured by boring holes in the table. I require an illumination more voluptuous than that of the gnomes when they heave up the mountain upon pillars and dance in a sea of flame. I require what most excites the senses, I require that delicious refreshment of perfumes which is more glorious than anything in the Arabian Nights. I require a coolness which voluptuously kindles desire, and then appeases the desire already satisfied. I require the ceaseless animation of a fountain. If Maecenas could not sleep without hearing the splash of a fountain, I cannot eat without it.”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

August 08

“How poor a thing is language compared with the unmeaning yet significant combination of clangorous sounds in a battle or at a banquet, which not even a theatrical rendering can reproduce, and for which language possesses but a few words! Yet how rich is language in the service of the wish, compared with its use for the description of reality!”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 09

“It was about ten o’clock in the evening of one of the last days of July when the participators assembled for that banquet. I have forgotten the day of the month and even the year; such things are the concern of memory, not of recollection. The only thing that properly concerns recollection is mood and what pertains to mood; and just as a generous wine gains by passing over the line because the watery particles evaporate, so too does recollection gain by losing the watery particles of memory — yet by this the recollection no more becomes a mere fancy than does the generous wine.”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

March 27

“So long as one is a child one has sufficient imagination, though it were for an hour in the dark room, to keep one’s soul on tiptoe, on the tiptoe of expectation; but when one is older, imagination easily has the effect of making one tired of the Christmas tree before one has a chance to see it.”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

March 15

“So long as one is a child one has sufficient imagination, though it were for an hour in the dark room, to keep one’s soul on tiptoe, on the tiptoe of expectation; but when one is older, imagination easily has the effect of making one tired of the Christmas tree before one has a chance to see it.”
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~Source: Stages on Life’s Way (1845)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard using the pseudonym Hilarius Bookbinder

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