August 1

“…More and more individuals, owing to their bloodless indolence, will aspire to be nothing at all — in order to become the public, that abstract whole formed in the most ludicrous way, by all participants becoming a third party (an onlooker). This indolent mass which understands nothing and does nothing itself, this gallery, is on the look-out for distraction and soon abandons itself to the idea that everything that anyone does is done in order to give it (the public) something to gossip about.”
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~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 31

“…More and more individuals, owing to their bloodless indolence, will aspire to be nothing at all — in order to become the public, that abstract whole formed in the most ludicrous way, by all participants becoming a third party (an onlooker). This indolent mass which understands nothing and does nothing itself, this gallery, is on the look-out for distraction and soon abandons itself to the idea that everything that anyone does is done in order to give it (the public) something to gossip about.”
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~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 25

“If a man had a little button sewn on the inner pocket of his coat ‘on principle’ his otherwise unimportant and quite serviceable action would become charged with importance–it is not improbable that it would result in the formation of a society. ‘On principle’ a man may interest himself in the founding of a brothel (there are plenty of social studies on the subject written by the health authorities), and the same man can ‘on principle’ assist in the publication of a new Hymn Book because it is supposed to be the great need of the times. But it would be as unjustifiable to conclude from the first fact that he was debauched as it would, perhaps, be to conclude from the second that he read or sang hymns.”
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~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 31

“…More and more individuals, owing to their bloodless indolence, will aspire to be nothing at all — in order to become the public, that abstract whole formed in the most ludicrous way, by all participants becoming a third party (an onlooker). This indolent mass which understands nothing and does nothing itself, this gallery, is on the look-out for distraction and soon abandons itself to the idea that everything that anyone does is done in order to give it (the public) something to gossip about.”
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~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 25

“If a man had a little button sewn on the inner pocket of his coat ‘on principle’ his otherwise unimportant and quite serviceable action would become charged with importance–it is not improbable that it would result in the formation of a society. ‘On principle’ a man may interest himself in the founding of a brothel (there are plenty of social studies on the subject written by the health authorities), and the same man can ‘on principle’ assist in the publication of a new Hymn Book because it is supposed to be the great need of the times. But it would be as unjustifiable to conclude from the first fact that he was debauched as it would, perhaps, be to conclude from the second that he read or sang hymns.”
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~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 31

“…More and more individuals, owing to their bloodless indolence, will aspire to be nothing at all — in order to become the public, that abstract whole formed in the most ludicrous way, by all participants becoming a third party (an onlooker). This indolent mass which understands nothing and does nothing itself, this gallery, is on the look-out for distraction and soon abandons itself to the idea that everything that anyone does is done in order to give it (the public) something to gossip about.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 25

“If a man had a little button sewn on the inner pocket of his coat ‘on principle’ his otherwise unimportant and quite serviceable action would become charged with importance–it is not improbable that it would result in the formation of a society. ‘On principle’ a man may interest himself in the founding of a brothel (there are plenty of social studies on the subject written by the health authorities), and the same man can ‘on principle’ assist in the publication of a new Hymn Book because it is supposed to be the great need of the times. But it would be as unjustifiable to conclude from the first fact that he was debauched as it would, perhaps, be to conclude from the second that he read or sang hymns.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 31

“…More and more individuals, owing to their bloodless indolence, will aspire to be nothing at all — in order to become the public, that abstract whole formed in the most ludicrous way, by all participants becoming a third party (an onlooker). This indolent mass which understands nothing and does nothing itself, this gallery, is on the look-out for distraction and soon abandons itself to the idea that everything that anyone does is done in order to give it (the public) something to gossip about.”
——————————————————–

~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

July 25

“If a man had a little button sewn on the inner pocket of his coat ‘on principle’ his otherwise unimportant and quite serviceable action would become charged with importance–it is not improbable that it would result in the formation of a society. ‘On principle’ a man may interest himself in the founding of a brothel (there are plenty of social studies on the subject written by the health authorities), and the same man can ‘on principle’ assist in the publication of a new Hymn Book because it is supposed to be the great need of the times. But it would be as unjustifiable to conclude from the first fact that he was debauched as it would, perhaps, be to conclude from the second that he read or sang hymns.”
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~Source: The Present Age (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

April 13

“The leveling process is not the action of an individual, but the work of reflection in the hands of an abstract power. It is therefore possible to calculate the law governing it in the same way that one calculates the diagonal in a parallelogram of forces…A demon is called up over whom no individual has any power, and though the very abstraction of leveling gives the individual a momentary, selfish kind of enjoyment, he is at the same time signing the warrant for his own doom. Enthusiasm *may* end in disaster, but leveling is *eo ipso* the destruction of the individual. No age, and therefore not the present age, can bring the skepticism of that process to a stop, for as soon as it tries to stop it, the law of the leveling process is again called into action. It can therefore only be stopped by the individual’s attaining the religious courage which springs from his individual religious isolation.”
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~Source: The Present Age: A Literary Review (1846)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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