May 15

“The loving man, he in whom there is love, hides the multitude of sins, sees not his neighbor’s fault, or, if he sees, hides it from himself and from others; love makes him blind in a sense far more beautiful than this can be said of a lover, blind to his neighbor’s sins. On the other hand, the loving man, he in whom there is love, though he has his faults, his imperfections, yea, though they were a multitude of sins, yet love, the fact that there is love in him, hides the multitude of sins.”
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~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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January 2

“What in paganism was sought after and sought in vain, what under the dominance of the Law was and is a fruitless effort — that the Gospel made possible. At the altar the Saviour stretches out His arms, precisely for that fugitive who would flee from the consciousness of his sin, flee from that which is worse than pursuit, namely, gnawing remorse; He stretches out His arms, He says, ‘Come hither,’ and the attitude of stretching out His arm is a way of saying, ‘Come hither,’ and of saying at the same time, ‘Love hides the multitude of sins.'”
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~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

May 15

“The loving man, he in whom there is love, hides the multitude of sins, sees not his neighbor’s fault, or, if he sees, hides it from himself and from others; love makes him blind in a sense far more beautiful than this can be said of a lover, blind to his neighbor’s sins. On the other hand, the loving man, he in whom there is love, though he has his faults, his imperfections, yea, though they were a multitude of sins, yet love, the fact that there is love in him, hides the multitude of sins.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 1

“What in paganism was sought after and sought in vain, what under the dominance of the Law was and is a fruitless effort — that the Gospel made possible. At the altar the Saviour stretches out His arms, precisely for that fugitive who would flee from the consciousness of his sin, flee from that which is worse than pursuit, namely, gnawing remorse; He stretches out His arms, He says, ‘Come hither,’ and the attitude of stretching out His arm is a way of saying, ‘Come hither,’ and of saying at the same time, ‘Love hides the multitude of sins.'”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

May 25

“The loving man, he in whom there is love, hides the multitude of sins, sees not his neighbor’s fault, or, if he sees, hides it from himself and from others; love makes him blind in a sense far more beautiful than this can be said of a lover, blind to his neighbor’s sins. On the other hand, the loving man, he in whom there is love, though he has his faults, his imperfections, yea, though they were a multitude of sins, yet love, the fact that there is love in him, hides the multitude of sins.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

May 15

“The loving man, he in whom there is love, hides the multitude of sins, sees not his neighbor’s fault, or, if he sees, hides it from himself and from others; love makes him blind in a sense far more beautiful than this can be said of a lover, blind to his neighbor’s sins. On the other hand, the loving man, he in whom there is love, though he has his faults, his imperfections, yea, though they were a multitude of sins, yet love, the fact that there is love in him, hides the multitude of sins.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 01

“What in paganism was sought after and sought in vain, what under the dominance of the Law was and is a fruitless effort — that the Gospel made possible. At the altar the Saviour stretches out His arms, precisely for that fugitive who would flee from the consciousness of his sin, flee from that which is worse than pursuit, namely, gnawing remorse; He stretches out His arms, He says, ‘Come hither,’ and the attitude of stretching out His arm is a way of saying, ‘Come hither,’ and of saying at the same time, ‘Love hides the multitude of sins.'”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

October 01

“What in paganism was sought after and sought in vain, what under the dominance of the Law was and is a fruitless effort — that the Gospel made possible. At the altar the Saviour stretches out His arms, precisely for that fugitive who would flee from the consciousness of his sin, flee from that which is worse than pursuit, namely, gnawing remorse; He stretches out His arms, He says, ‘Come hither,’ and the attitude of stretching out His arm is a way of saying, ‘Come hither,’ and of saying at the same time, ‘Love hides the multitude of sins.'” ——————————————————– ~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851) Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 15

“The loving man, he in whom there is love, hides the multitude of sins, sees not his neighbor’s fault, or, if he sees, hides it from himself and from others; love makes him blind in a sense far more beautiful than this can be said of a lover, blind to his neighbor’s sins. On the other hand, the loving man, he in whom there is love, though he has his faults, his imperfections, yea, though they were a multitude of sins, yet love, the fact that there is love in him, hides the multitude of sins.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

May 25

“The loving man, he in whom there is love, hides the multitude of sins, sees not his neighbor’s fault, or, if he sees, hides it from himself and from others; love makes him blind in a sense far more beautiful than this can be said of a lover, blind to his neighbor’s sins. On the other hand, the loving man, he in whom there is love, though he has his faults, his imperfections, yea, though they were a multitude of sins, yet love, the fact that there is love in him, hides the multitude of sins.”
——————————————————–

~Source: Two Discourses At The Communion On Fridays (1851)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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