February 1

“But when it is a duty to love, there no test is needed and the insulting stupidity of wishing to test is superfluous; since love is higher than any proof, it has already more than met the test, in the same sense that faith ‘more than conquers.’ The very fact of testing always presupposes a possibility; it is still always possible that that which is tested may not meet the test. Hence if someone wished to test whether he has faith, or tried to get faith, then this would really mean that he will hinder himself in aquiring faith; he will become a victim of the restless craving where faith is never won, for ‘thou shalt believe.'”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

January 8

“Earthly goods are an external reality, therefore one can own them even while being as one who does not own them; but spiritual goods exist only inwardly, exist only in being possessed, and therefore one cannot, if one really possess them, be as one who does not possess them; on the contrary, if one is such, then one simply does not possess them. If someone believes that he has faith and yet is indifferent to his possession, neither cold not warm, then he can be sure that he does not have faith.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 15

“This was the commandment, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself,’ but when the commandment is rightly understood it also says the converse, ‘Thou shalt love thyself in the right way.’ If anyone, therefore, will not learn from Christianity to love himself in the right way, then neither can he love his neighbor; he may perhaps, as we say, ‘for life and death’ cling to one or several human beings, but this is by no means loving one’s neighbor. To love one’s self in the right way and to love one’s neighbor are absolutely analogous concepts, are at bottom one and the same.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

June 12

“But the primitiveness of faith is related to the beginning of Christianity. Extravagant descriptions of heathendom, its errors, its characteristics, are by no means needed; the signs of the Christlike are contained in Christianity itself. Make an experiment: forget for a moment Christian love, consider what you know about other love, recall what you read in the poets, what you yourself can discover, and then say whether it ever occurred to you to conceive this: Thou shalt love.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

May 13

“The lover discovers nothing, hence he conceals the multitude of sins which would be exposed through the discovery. The life of the lover is an expression of the apostolic precept of being a child in malice. That which the world really admires as shrewdness is an understanding of evil; wisdom is essentially the understanding of the good. The lover has no understanding of evil and does not wish to have; he is and remains, he wishes to be and to continue to be, in this respect, a child.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

April 18

“Christianity knows a better answer to the question of what love is and about loving than does any poet. Precisely therefore it knows too that which escapes the attention of many poets, that the love they praise is secretly self-love, and that this explains its intoxicated expression about loving another man better than one’s self. Earthly love is still not the eternal love; it is the beautiful fantasy of the infinite, its highest expression is mysterious foolishness.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

April 4

“When Christ said ‘Beware of men,’ I wonder if that warning did not imply this: ‘Beware lest through men, that is, through perpetual comparison with other men, through habit and externalities, you allow yourself to be defrauded of the supreme good.'”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

March 9

“Worldly similarity, if it were possible, is not Christian equality. Moreover, to bring about worldly similarity perfectly is an impossibility. Well-intentioned worldliness actually admits this itself. It rejoices when it succeeds in making temporal conditions the same for more and more people, but it acknowledges itself that its struggle is a pious wish, that it has taken on a prodigious task, that its prospects are remote — if it rightly understood itself, it would perceive that this will never be achieved in temporality, that even if this struggle is continued for centuries, it will never attain its goal.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

March 2

“There is indeed a big dispute going on in the world about what should be called the highest. But whatever it is called now, whatever variations there are, it is unbelievable how much prolixity is involved in taking hold of it. Christianity, however, immediately teaches a person the shortest way to find the highest: Shut your door and pray to God — because God is surely the highest. If someone goes out into the world to try to find the beloved or the friend, he can go a long way — and go in vain, can wander the world around — and in vain. But Christianity is never responsible for having a person go even a single step in vain, because when you open the door that you shut in order to pray to God and go out the very first person you meet is the neighbor, whom you shall love.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

February 15

“This was the commandment, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself,’ but when the commandment is rightly understood it also says the converse, ‘Thou shalt love thyself in the right way.’ If anyone, therefore, will not learn from Christianity to love himself in the right way, then neither can he love his neighbor; he may perhaps, as we say, ‘for life and death’ cling to one or several human beings, but this is by no means loving one’s neighbor. To love one’s self in the right way and to love one’s neighbor are absolutely analogous concepts, are at bottom one and the same.”
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~Source: Works of Love (1847)
Author: Søren Kierkegaard

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